Saturday, March 20, 2010

In these Extraordinary Times:

Another reason to acknowledging that we are living at a precarious time for our environment is that most of the large fishing stocks in the oceans are failing. “WWF - Poorly managed fishing” Man has fished the oceans for a long time, but only recently has the amount of fish taken from the ocean meant a possible collapse of our ocean’s fish.  Cod fishing off the Canadian coast has crashed and the bluefin Tuna populations are threatened (with no solution imminent) and the fishing collapse issue is not getting better. 

Oftentimes, as with human nature, these collapses occur so slowly in our own particular lifetimes, we don’t see how extraordinary fast they are occurring on an environmental scale.  Near the end of fishing collapse those born recently might think the numbers of fish normal and a few more fish gone hardly worth noticing.  But, this inability or refusal to see environmental issues on a longer time scale than our own individual lives means that (like the boiling frog metaphor) we plunge our environmental into collapse without even knowing it.  That’s why we must change our attitude towards our environment, and force ourselves to see what’s really going on.  

The End of the Line is making waves for fish stocks recovery | guardian.co.uk "The End of the Line began life as a ground-breaking book by the environment journalist Charles Clover in 2004. It was an impassioned description of the wanton destruction being wreaked on fish stocks by industrial fishing round the world. It left me feeling both angry and despondent. Now it's been turned into a film of the same title, and it's a must-see. "

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