Saturday, December 23, 2006

Simple Solutions For Our Environment

Simple Solutions for our Environment:

There is a new law coming out of Canada that sounds like a simple solution to a complex problem, yet it is a profound law that (I believe) will greatly affect fish life in Canada’s Quetico Provincial Park. We should adopt this law for all our lakes in the United States and especially in New York. It may sound extreme to some (especially those who make a profit from live bait and barbed fish hooks) but we can also find a way to compensate those who will pay the price for helping to protect our waters. The ecology of our lakes—both the Finger Lakes and Lake Ontario—that surround the Rochester area is becoming more dear.

Soon, our government is going to implement a new measure to control Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, a fish disease that has caused wide-spread damage to our area’s fish population, by inspecting live bait. [Check out: Big Prices for Small Fish New regulations force minnow costs to rise - Fishermen in New York and the rest of the Great Lakes region might want to budget a few extra dollars for bait in 2007. Minnow prices - now as low as $1 a dozen in some Central New York bait shops - are likely to increase as a result of emergency regulations issued by state and federal strictures to slow the spread of Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, a disease implicated in recent die-offs of fish in the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario and Conesus Lake. Just how much the cost of bait will go up, and when, isn't yet known. (December 15, 2006) Latest News and More From Syracuse.com ] But, we should go further to protect our lakes by adopting Canada’s new law: “The new rules prohibit the use of any organic bait - anything like worms or leeches, living or dead. The rules also prohibit the use of hooks that have barbs on them. Next year, visitors will need to use artificial lures or bait, and the hooks will have to be barbless.” From Trying to Get off the Hook -- Canadian officials introduce new rules for fishing in the waters of an Ontario wilderness.by Earthwatch Radio

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